Source: Vegas Seven

Dean Ambrose and Renee Young spoke to Vegas Seven about life in and outside of the ring. Here are some of the highlights:

Why Ambrose wrestles in a shirt:

"I said, 'What I'm going to do is dress as plain as humanly possible.' I'm not going to wear anything fancy, I'm not going to have fancy music, I'm not going to have fancy pyro—I'm literally just going to be a dude walking into the ring. I'm going to look like I just got off work from a construction site and I am now punching you in the face. That was my goal­—be as simple as humanly possible. I pretty much stick to Hanes or Fruit of the Loom. You can wear large, you know, but you like to make it a little snug sometimes, shape the contours. It's best to leave a little bit to the imagination, then at a certain point in the evening, in the match when the intensity is high, you get to rip off the shirt. You get a big pop for that. And then you can throw the shirt to somebody. It gives you another prop to work with. You can get your shirt ripped off or halfway ripped off, and then you look like you've been beaten up a lot more than you really have."

Fans that go too far:

Ambrose: "I have a particular demographic. I think I appeal to a lot of people who might have problems of their own [and] they relate to me. It's cool when you can help and inspire people and stuff, but sometimes people just attach to you for strange reasons, [and] their behavior is not the best. I've been stalked, I've been—"

Young: "I get many a death threat. Well, I mean, there's a lot of anti–Renee Young pages out there."

Ambrose: "It's actually good to make this point. But without going into too much detail, I've been stalked on the phone and my home and hotels, to the point where it's a little Single White Female scary, though I'm pretty sure I'm not gonna get beaten up and kidnapped by a 15-year-old girl."

Young: "I don't know...there are a lot of steroids in foods now."

Ambrose: "I've been stalked fairly regularly for the last two years. I have to go to great lengths to keep that s--- at bay."

Doing things on-screen Ambrose doesn't believe in:

"I've gotten asked to do things that, sometimes, I think, 'That's stupid.' If you do anything a hundred percent, if you commit to it, even if sucks, it'll at least suck a hundred percent. One my favorites was when Vince [McMahon, the driving force behind WWE] wanted me to carry this little red wagon full of weapons around the ring in Brooklyn, the hardest audience that we have. And I'm getting ready for a fight with Brock Lesnar. So I'm like, 'I'm about to go into a match that will be a fight to the death with the beast incarnate, who's going to probably kill me—this is not a time for laughs. If I come out there with a little red wagon, they're gonna laugh at me.' But he's like, 'No, you're not even gonna look at Brock. You're just gonna pull that wagon, put your weapons in it, walk around, go to the back.' He said, 'Because it's not a joke to you. This wagon is serious'—and in Vince's mind, he saw it a certain way, and I went, 'All right, fine, OK. I'll drag the little red wagon, and I'm gonna drag the s--- out of that little red wagon.' And I went out there, was mean-muggin' with this little red wagon, and it was so ridiculous, but I took it seriously. They loved it, and I was like, 'I cannot believe that worked.'"

Both also discussed being on reality TV, people who say "Wrestling is fake," and life without pro wrestling. You can read the full interview by clicking here.

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