- UFC light heavyweight champion Jon Jones passed a drug test on the night of his fight against Daniel Cormier at UFC 214 on July 29, 2017, according to MMAMania. Jones' test the day before on July 28 returned positive for Turinabol in his scheduled urine screening, which is now threatening a four-year ban on him fighting again. Jones also passed seven unannounced drug tests before returning a positive result, not to mention the negative one roughly 24 hours after a positive test. His manager, Malki Kawa, spoke to MMAFighting.com about it:

"I'm encouraging everyone to go out there and take a look at the tests he passed and the test he failed," Kawa told MMA Fighting. "It's a three-week window the month of the fight. Jon has passed seven unannounced tests, and the one he's going to fail is the one that's announced? It's weird to me, there's a lot of things here that don't add up, and to the UFC, it doesn't add up."

- The UFC is coming to FITE TV, beginning with UFC 215 next Saturday, September 9, 2017. Fans will be able to stream the show live on the FITE app or through its website at FITE.tv. UFC 215: Johnson vs. Borg will take place live at Rogers Place in Edmonton, Alberta.

- Ringside physician Darragh O'Carroll, MD, praised referee Robert Byrd for stopping Floyd Mayweather vs. Conor McGregor when he did. Here's what O'Carroll wrote about it:

Byrd's calculation to call a stoppage was likely not based on signs of fatigue, but rather signs of traumatic brain injury. Ataxia, or dizziness and loss of balance, is one of the hallmarks of concussion, a type of mild traumatic brain injury. Fatigue may cause sluggish and slow movements, but does not cause the imbalance and poor coordination exhibited by McGregor in the 10th round. Being wobbly, in the setting of pugilistic trauma, will always be treated as the result of head trauma and not as fatigue. To let a fighter continue on would be grossly negligent.

You can read his full post by clicking here.

- Speaking of Mayweather vs. McGregor, Showtime executive vice president Stephen Espinoza told the Los Angeles Times the fight is"tracking in the mid-to-high 4 million pay-per view buys."

"If we don't reach the record, we're going to be very, very close," he said, "we consider it a massive success."

You can read more of his comments by clicking here.

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