WRESTLING NEWS
Tag Team Partners Who Genuinely Hated Each Other
By ROBERT CORNAL
Initially rivals, Hulk Hogan and "Macho Man" Randy Savage joined forces in 1987 as The Mega Powers, but Savage and Hogan's relationship was tumultuous. Despite accusations of ruining marriages and diss tracks, Hogan got emotional, saying that the two reconciled a few months before Savage died from a heart attack and that he was a "great person."
Hogan and Savage
Former classmates Mitsuharu Misawa and Toshiaki Kawada were known as two of AJPW's Four Pillars of Heaven before teaming up as Super Generation Army, but Kawada was always second to Misawa's stardom. Tensions mounted as the two could not share a locker room, leading to a backstage altercation with Kawada coming out on top.
Kawada and Misawa
Marty Jannetty and Shawn Michaels joined the WWF as The Rockers, but their relationship was uncomfortable and even led to a physical altercation. Michaels claims Jannetty negotiated on the team's behalf as he felt they were underpaid, and while Jannetty wanted to leave, Michaels intended on staying, even if it meant going solo.
Jannetty and Michaels
The British Bulldogs, David Smith and Tom Billington, were among the best tag teams of all time, but Smith left to become a solo star in the WWF, taking the trademark to the team name with him. In his 1999 autobiography "Pure Dynamite," Billington wrote, "I haven't spoken to Davey Boy Smith in over eight years, and probably never will again."
Dynamite Kid and Davey Boy
As The Soul Patrol, Rocky Johnson and Tony Atlas became the first World Tag Team Champions of African American descent in WWF history. In a shoot interview with The Hannibal TV, Atlas claimed they were never friends as Johnson would leave him at hotels on the road, and they got into a fistfight before losing the tag titles.
Atlas and Johnson