Stephanie McMahon has been one of the driving forces behind the Women's Revolution in WWE. Over the last five years the women have gone from being involved in lackluster feuds with one or two-minute matches, to being featured all over the show. The women have continued to make strides in the past few years including getting their own Royal Rumble match and being featured in the main event at WrestleMania 35.

In a recent interview with The National, McMahon explained that the progress has been amazing to be a part of but did mention that there is still more to do including trying to add more female writers.

"We do not have enough," McMahon said. "We do not have enough female writers in the writers' room, we are actively working on that. There is a dedicated focus to how we tell our women's storylines in the show, but we can always be better."

McMahon also said that the increased focus on the females has allowed the fanbase to grow in that area as well.

"I've grown up in WWE so I have a bit of a different story than your typical executive, but I have seen our female fan base grow to now nearly 40 per cent," McMahon said. "I have seen little girls in our audiences wearing all the merchandise of our female superstars – and little boys, too, by the way. I've definitely seen a huge growth in our business."

McMahon discussed how the women were always featured on WWE TV but for were mostly reduced to small roles as managers and not focused on in the way the men were.

"Throughout the years, we've seen women's wrestling ebb and flow," McMahon explained. "In the Attitude Era, it was thought that our women were 'nice to have' not a 'need to have'. They weren't featured as main events, they were in various other roles."

McMahon's husband, Triple H, is also deserving of a lot of the credit for the advancement in women's wrestling according to her. In NXT the women were given a lot more opportunities and time to develop their storylines and have better matches.

"He started recruiting elite female athletes, as well as men, and he started training the women the same as the men, giving them the same amount of match time on television at our live events," McMahon said. "These women, when given the opportunity, absolutely started to steal the show every time, [to the point] our fans started chanting 'this is wrestling' and 'women's wrestling'."