Arn Anderson was recently back on The Arn Show and reminisced about Undertaker and Brock Lesnar's final Hell In A Cell match. Anderson recalled Undertaker being in a lot of pain, but not wanting to tell anybody, and he mentioned how much respect he has for Undertaker's professionalism.

"Jaw on the ground, awestruck, respectful, almost remorseful that I knew his body was not in any condition to be putting it through what he did, but he's such a professional," Arn said. "He is such a showman. He has so much respect for the business. Hell in a Cell with Brock Lesnar is a nightmare in anybody's book.

"They took their time," Arn added. "They upped the violence; they made it a Hell in a Cell and what Hell in a Cell should be every time. If you cant produce that quality, don't have Hell in a Cell, and if you don't have one for two or three years, fine. It was one of those things that you knew Taker was hurting. He wasn't going to let anybody else know that. Brock Lesnar was a lot more qualified, savvy performer this time around than he was back in '02 obviously, when he was first starting. He was a lot more seasoned and his timing was better. He has a lot of respect for Taker. Taker respects Brock as well, and it was one of those, at the end of the night, it certainly paid dividends."

Arn went in-depth on the blood shown during that match when Lesnar was split open, and he said it wasn't shocking that color was presented because of the level they were taking the match to.

"If you go back and look, that's where Lesnar almost cut the post in half," Arn joked. "I would hope if there's any blood mixed in with the ice water that's in his veins, that you would have probably seen some of that because he hit that post dead on the fly. No trying to protect himself, no hands up to block some of that - he just ran through the post. He was split wide open, and he was bleeding, and the shoving the doctor was just something he felt at the time, just part of his DNA makeup.

"If I would have been the doctor, that would have been plenty for me," Arn added. "I would have found the exit to the door. Once it was established-- people are going to get split open. People get hurt in this business, people get injured. That's the one part that drives all of us that have wrestled night, after night, after night, and gotten hurt and got split open. It's a rough way to make a living, and these guys, when you take it to the next level like they did, you know the fact that somebody got split open. It's really not surprising."

On the topic of color being presented in matches, Arn said Undertaker didn't have the option of doing it the old way in this particular match because Batista had just been fined 50 grand for it.

"[Undertaker] didn't have the option of the old way," Arn said. "That got Batista a huge fine; I think 50 grand. Ask him about that and the reality is this that back in the day, we were performing magic and we were making everyone wonder if what they were seeing was real. Are these guys really pissed at each other? I know it's a show, but are they pissed? Hard way was one way that you convince the audience they're having a fight, and just like techniques, you can ask any boxer out there if you just solely want to knock a guy's eye shut. I'm sure he could tell you.

"The reality is, there's a sharp bone that circles your orbital bone," Arn added. "If you hit somebody really hard, there's a sharp bone right there. If you hit in a downward motion, it will split somebody's eye. If you find that to be gruesome, you're right, and if it's somebody that don't know what they're doing and they're knocking the piss out of you everywhere but where that sharp bone is, you're going to get your eyes knocked shut anyway and it's going to be painful. But it is a way of producing the gore that is necessary in some matches and it is a hard way, and that's why it's called the hard way, because it hurts and you have to be a professional at it to be successful at getting it done without potentially doing a lot of damage."

If you use any of the quotes in this article, please credit The Arn Show with a h/t to Wrestling Inc. for the transcription.

Mehdy Labriny contributed to this article.