WWE confirmed to Sports Illustrated that Zelina Vega (Thea Trinidad) was terminated on Friday for breaching her contract.

The "final straw" was considered to be Vega opening an OnlyFans account, despite WWE's edict on third-party platforms. Her account featured exclusive videos and photos of "cosplays, lingerie, swimsuits and more," for $30 a month. In September, WWE Superstars were told they would have to close down accounts on sites, like Cameo and Twitch — even if they were using their real names and avoided any affiliation with WWE.

Vega was reportedly very vocal about keeping her Twitch account, but according to the SI report, WWE upper management felt she "boxed them into a difficult situation" by sticking with her third-party platforms. WWE had said previously talent would be fined, or potentially released, if they didn't adhere to their demands.

This, of course, has brought on the debate of how WWE treats its talent, as they are currently classified as independent contractors. That conversation has grabbed not only the attention of Andrew Yang, but, SAG-AFTRA President Gabrielle Carteris, who sent Wrestling Inc. a statement this morning in regards to the possibility of working with wrestlers:

"Wrestling is as much about media as it is sports, and we are going to directly engage with members of this profession to help find ways for them to protect themselves," Carteris wrote. "As more people reinvest in unions, and as more working people are harassed by employers who don't want to protect them, SAG-AFTRA is committed to doing what we can to help professional wrestlers secure the protections they deserve."

Carteris also personally reached out to Vega on social media after Zelina's "I support unionization" tweet picked up steam.